Lumber Futures Strategy (Backtest And Example)

Last Updated on December 12, 2022

Lumber is a key material for house construction, and lumber futures is the main method of trading this commodity. Used by builders, furniture makers, kitchen cabinet makers, and so on, lumber currently contributes more than $600 billion to the global economy, accounting for approximately 1% of the global GDP. With a huge chunk of this trading as lumber futures, what is your lumber futures strategy?

A lumber futures strategy is a method or technique that can be used to profitably trade the lumber futures market. Lumber futures are a financial derivative contract to deliver or receive a specified quantity of lumber on a future date and at a pre-agreed price. The contract currently trades on the CME Globex platform, and it enables traders to gain leveraged exposure to the softwood market. Hedgers and speculators trade lumber futures for risk management and financial gain through price speculation.

In addition to a backtest, we also answer some questions about the Lumber futures strategy.

What are Lumber futures?

Lumber futures are a financial derivative contract to deliver or receive a specified quantity of lumber on a future date and at a pre-agreed price. The contract currently trades on the CME Globex platform, and it enables traders to gain leveraged exposure to the softwood market. On contract expiry, trades are settled through the actual delivery of lumber to the buyer.

The contract is mostly traded by industry stakeholders, such as lumber producers and suppliers, builders, and furniture makers, who trade it for hedging purposes. However, some investors and traders also trade it to diversify their portfolios or speculate on lumber prices.

What is a Lumber futures strategy?

A lumber futures strategy is a set of methodologies and techniques for trading lumber futures profitably. It includes fundamental and technical analysis strategies. With the fundamental analysis, you can identify the factors dominating the market, while technical analysis can help you with market timing, position sizing, and risk management.

You must have a reliable trading strategy to increase your chances of making money with futures trading. Your strategy for the lumber futures market should include clear entry and exit signals and risk management techniques.

Lumber futures strategy backtest

A backtest with strict trading rules, settings, statistics, and historical performance is coming soon.

What is the seasonality of Lumber futures?

Seasonality in the financial markets refers to the tendency of an asset’s price to move in a fairly predictable manner during certain periods of the year, which can be months or seasons like winter and summer.

From the chart below, lumber futures tend to perform better during the months of November, December, January, and March than other months of the year.

Lumber futures strategy
Source: Equity Clock

What moves the Lumber What affects the lumber the most?

The prices of lumber futures are influenced by a wide range of other factors, some of which are listed below:

  • Reports from the housing and construction industries: Lumber is a critical component of the housing and construction industries; as a result, lumber prices are typically sensitive to reports on the housing and construction industries because these reports provide indicators of the commodity’s level of demand.
  • Lumber supply: Anything that affects the production and supply of lumber, such as changes in forest cover or deforestation, can affect lumber prices.
  • Price of substitutes: Other building materials, such as metals and plastics, may be used in place of wood in some cases. This is because these alternatives are less expensive. As a result, the prices of these alternatives may have an impact on lumber prices.
  • Trade policy: Trade policies (tariffs, quotas, and subsidies) in large countries that produce and consume lumber can significantly impact lumber prices.

How are Lumber futures traded?

Lumber futures are traded on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange (CME) through its Globex electronic trading platform. There are two types of contracts: the regular lumber futures with a contract unit of 27,500 board feet and the random length lumber futures with a contract unit of 110,000 board feet. The price quotation is in US dollars and cents per 1000 board feet (MBF).

The contract trades from Monday to Friday, from 9:00 a.m. – 3:05 p.m. CT on the Globex. For the CME ClearPort, the trading schedule is Sunday 5:00 p.m. – Friday 5:45 p.m. CT, but there is no reporting Monday – Thursday from 5:45 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. CT.

There are monthly contracts of January, March, May, July, September, and November cycles listed for 7 months. The contract expires on the 16th day of the contract month, and on expiry, the contract is settled by physical delivery of the specified quantity and grade of lumber. Trading terminates at 12:05 p.m. CT on the business day prior to the day of contract expiry — the 16th day of the contract month.

How do you start trading Lumber futures?

You’ll need the help of a futures broker to help you clear your trades and gain access to the exchanges where lumber futures contracts are traded. To begin trading lumber futures, you must first open an account with a futures broker and deposit funds into that account. Because futures contracts are leveraged instruments, you do not need to have the full dollar value of the contract to trade it. Instead, you only need to deposit the initial margin or slightly more.

If all you want to do is speculate on the direction of prices, trading lumber CFDs that track lumber futures is a good option for you. When you use a contract for difference, you are in an agreement with the broker to exchange the price difference between the opening and closing of a trade. Lumber futures CFD are available from CFD brokers, such as IG.

What is the Lumber trading at?

Lumber futures were trading at $410.0 per board feet as of December 9th, 2022. See the chart here on the CME platform chart. The chart (LBS) was captured from TradingView.

Note that the price changes continuously, so the quoted price may not be the price. It’s trading when you are reading this post. Click on either of those links to get the real-time price on the CME platform or directly from TradingView.

What’s Lumber futures hour?

On the CME Globex electronic platform, lumber futures (LBS) trades from Monday to Friday, from 9:00 a.m. – 3:05 p.m. CT on the Globex. For the CME ClearPort, the trading schedule is: Sunday 5:00 p.m. – Friday 5:45 p.m. CT, but there is no reporting Monday – Thursday from 5:45 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. CT.

The last trading day is the business day before the 16th calendar day of the contract month at 12:05 pm.

Where can I find trading charts?

The chart is available on any trading platform that provides chart services. If your platform does provide charts, you can use TradingView, which provides free access to the charts of various instruments. However, to connect TradingView to your broker, you must subscribe to its Pro services. From the CME platform chart, you can also access the TradingView chart.

You can also subscribe to trading charts through a third-party platform like MultiCharts.

What are the trading symbols for Lumber futures?

The trading symbol is LBS. Here are the codes for the various sections:

  • CME Globex: LBS
  • CME ClearPort: LB
  • Clearing: LB

What is the specification for the Lumber futures contract?

Lumber futures contracts on the CME are priced in US dollars and cents. A random length lumber futures contract is equivalent to 110,000 board feet of lumber, and the pricing unit is dollars per 1,000 board feet (MBF). Individual pieces of lumber range in size from 2 inches by 4 inches to 8 to 20 feet in length.

There are monthly contracts of January, March, May, July, September, and November cycles listed for 7 months. The contract expires on the 16th day of the contract month, and on expiry, the contract is settled by physical delivery of the specified quantity and grade of lumber. Trading terminates at 12:05 p.m. CT on the business day prior to the day of contract expiry — the 16th day of the contract month.

Why should you start trading Lumber futures?

There are so many reasons to trade lumber futures. They include the following:

  • Hedging your exposure in the market if you are a producer or make use of lumber (a furniture maker)
  • For speculative reasons, to profit from daily changes in lumber commodity prices
  • Portfolio diversification across a variety of asset classes to lower the system’s overall risk

What is the contract size?

The CME Globex platform’s lumber futures contract equals 110,000 board feet (approximately 260 cubic meters). Given the current price of lumber at $410.0 per 1,000 board feet, the USD worth of a full contract unit would be 110,000 x $410.00/1,000 = $45,000.

What is the tick size?

One contract of lumber futures has a tick size of $11.00 per tick per contract.

What is the minimum price fluctuation for Lumber futures?

The minimum price fluctuation for lumber futures is $0.10 per MBF.

Are there any ETFs?

The two most common ETFs that track lumber futures include:

  • iShares Global Timber & Forestry ETF (WOOD)
  • Invesco MSCI Global Timber ETF (CUT)

What factors affect Lumber prices?

Many factors can affect the prices of lumber futures, and these are some of them:

  • Information from the housing and construction industries: Lumber is a critical component of the housing and construction industries; as a result, lumber prices are typically sensitive to reports on the housing and construction industries because these reports provide indicators of the commodity’s level of demand.
  • Lumber supply: Anything that affects the production and supply of lumber, such as changes in forest cover or deforestation, can affect lumber prices.
  • Cost of substitutes: Other building materials, such as metals and plastics, may be used in place of wood in some cases. This is because these alternatives are less expensive. As a result, the prices of these alternatives may have an impact on lumber prices.
  • Economic policy: Tariffs, quotas, and subsidies in large countries that are both producers and consumers of lumber can significantly impact lumber prices.

What is the all-time high for Lumber futures?

According to the TradingView chart for the CME lumber futures (LBS), the all-time high for lumber futures is $1,733.50 per MBF. This price was reached in May 2021.

What are the biggest risks in trading Lumber futures?

When trading lumber futures, the most significant risk is adverse price movement. Because it is a leveraged contract, losses are calculated based on the total worth of the contract rather than the initial margin deposit. For example, if you trade with a leverage of 10:1, a 1% negative move in price results in a 10% loss in your account, and a 10% adverse move in price would result in a complete loss of your account.

Another significant risk is a lack of liquid assets. Because fewer retail traders participate in the lumber futures market, it is not as liquid as gold or crude oil markets. As a result, it may not be easy to get out of your trade quickly and the spreads can be high.

What is the settlement method?

At expiration, the contract is settled by physical delivery.

What is the settlement procedure?

Lumber futures (LBS) are settled on the CME platform by physical delivery. CME Group staff determines the settlement of the expiring lumber contract by following the regular daily settlement procedure.

What is the block minimum for Lumber futures?

20 contracts.

What is the difference between Lumber futures and the CFD instrument for lumber?

Unlike lumber futures which trade on regulated futures exchanges, lumber CFDs are simply agreements to exchange the price difference between the time a trade is opened and the time it is closed. With a CFD, you are at the mercy of the CFD broker. However, CFDs can be traded indefinitely without worrying about contract expiration or asset delivery, which happens with futures contracts.

Which forex pair is the same as Lumber futures

Lumber CFD

What are some important dates for this market?

These are a few of the important dates for the lumber futures market:

  • 1969 when lumber futures first traded on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange (CME)
  • 2008 when electronic Random Length Lumber futures and options were launched on CME Globex

What is the highest lumber has ever been its all-time high?

From TradingView’s chart for the CME lumber futures (LBS), the highest price lumber has ever reached was $1,733.50, which happened in May 2021.

What is the lowest lumber has ever been its all-time low?

From TradingView’s chart for the CME lumber futures, the lowest price lumber has ever reached was $94.6, which happened in October 1974.

Conclusion

Trading lumber futures allow you to diversify your trading portfolio, protect yourself from inflation, and potentially profit from speculation. However, if you want to succeed in trading lumber futures, you must use the appropriate lumber futures strategy.

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